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Committed to People, Committed to the Future.

Diversity Promotion

The maximization of the capabilities and strengths of diverse employees is critical for active innovation and corporate growth. Based on this belief, the Toshiba Group has positioned the promotion of diversity as one of its integral management policy visions. With our CEO's strong commitment, we thrive to spread the awareness on the importance of diversity for both employees and those outside the company.

Medium- to Long-term Vision

To achieve creative growth by enabling a diverse workforce who share Toshiba Group's management vision and values to excel globally.

Quantitative Target

Percentage of female managers
(Toshiba Corp., at the end of FY2020)
7.0%

FY 2016 Achievement

Percentage of female managers

Achievement4.3%
(Toshiba Corp., at the end of FY2016)

Future Challenges and Approaches

As globalization and other global trends advance, we will proactively reflect the diverse values of our employees in our management. In particular, we will strive to promote managerial diversity, appointing diverse human resources as women and foreign national employees in executive posts, as well as developing candidates. We will also work to expand the place of handicapped people in the workforce. We will create a work environment where each employee can demonstrate his or her talents to the greatest extent possible.

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Policy on Diversity Promotion

Toward the restoration of trust in Toshiba Group and its regeneration, we are working to promote diversity in order to establish a corporate culture that enables diverse personnel to play active roles irrespective of gender, nationality, or whether they have disabilities or not.

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Diversity Management Structure

In 2004, we established our Kirameki Life & Career Promotion Office, an organization under the CEO's direct control, consisting of both men and women.

After that, we expanded the scope of our activities to include foreign nationals and people with disabilities. As diversity became the very core of our human resources work, the office was reorganized into the Human Resources & Administration Diversity Development Division in FY2013, which has been advancing diversity measures as a general human resources matter. In FY2015, this was further reorganized into the Management Reform Division, Corporate Culture Reform & Diversity Group, which is working to achieve an open corporate culture.

Our Corporate Senior Executive Vice President acts as the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO), the executive officer in charge of diversity promotion.

And each Toshiba Group company establishes a Diversity Strategy Committee, which serves as an advisory organization to effect diversity measures proactively and independently.

The committee convenes regularly, chaired by the CDO and attended by the executive officer in charge of personnel affairs, as well by the presidents of in-house and major Group companies to determine the direction of diversity strategies for each Toshiba Group company.

The committee has taken various actions to promote diversity, including measures to recruit more women in Japan, policies and measures to develop and appoint more female managers, as well as developing global personnel and improving their employment environments.

Structure of Diversity Strategy Committee

Structure of Diversity Strategy Committee

Diversity Strategy Committee
Diversity Strategy Committee

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Diversity Management Approach

Toshiba Group strives to create an organizational culture where diverse individuality and employee values are accepted and respected and where each employee is provided the opportunity to maximize their capabilities and strengths. Our efforts include diversity training where employees learn to accept and respect diversity of each individual and study about human rights for all employees.

Further, we conduct awareness surveys targeted at Group employees in Japan, and monitor the level of diversity awareness throughout the workplace. Where improvements are called for, we conduct training as necessary, and strive for better work environments.

Disseminating information about diversity management

Toshiba Group has set up an intranet web page about diversity management. On it, we provide information about topics such as supporting employees in balancing their child-raising and nursing care duties with their work, a portal site to support personnel who work with non-Japanese employees, and support for employees with disabilities.

Intranet web page "Kirameki" Intranet web page "Kirameki"

Promoting the Career Development of Female Employees

Toshiba is promoting measures to accelerate success for female employees.

The Act to Advance Women's Success in Their Working Life was enacted in FY2016. The act defines the obligations of national and local governments and private business owners to advance women's careers to realize a society that enables women to fully develop their creativity and abilities. Based on this act, Toshiba has developed an action plan aimed at increasing the percentage of female managers to at least 7.0% by FY2020. We have also set our recruitment target for new female university graduates at 50% for administrative positions and 25% for technical positions. In our action plan, we formulated measures to achieve these targets, including following progress in training for female manager candidates and awareness raising for managers and workers.

Trends in the number/percentage of female managers
(Toshiba Corp. , section manager level or higher)

Trends in the number/percentage of female managers (Toshiba Corp. , section manager level or higher)
Percentage breakdown of female managers (Toshiba Corp.)
  FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016
Percentage of female managers 3.8% 3.8% 4.1% 4.3%
  Section manager class 4.4% 4.5% 4.8% 5.1%
Division manager class 3.0% 2.7% 2.9% 3.0%

Percentage of female recruits (Toshiba Corp.)

Recruitment of new university graduates for administrative and technical positions at Toshiba to start work in April 2017 has been canceled.

Composition of Employees (Toshiba Corp.)

Composition of Employees (Toshiba Corp.)
Key training systems and measures for promoting the career development of female employees
System/Measure Overview
Career training for young female employees As of FY2015, career design training for all female employees in their third year since joining the company
Program overview:
  • Thinking about how to balance possible future life events and work
  • Improving mindset via letters from supervisors
  • Role model lectures from senior female colleagues
Sending employees to cross-industrial exchange training for female employees We send female prospective leadership candidates to cross-industrial exchange training for female employees, to encourage them to widen their perspective, engage in networking, and improve their communication skills (initiated in FY2014, and participated in by young female employees from 7 cross-industry companies, including Toshiba).
Awareness promotion training for top management A subject covering how to train and communicate with female subordinates has been included in the curriculum for mandatory training for persons promoted to manager (since FY2010, roughly 100 programs have been held with a total of over 3,000 employee participants).
Seminar to support employees returning after childcare leave (for the relevant employee and supervisor) Since FY2015, we have conducted seminars for those scheduled to return to work after childcare leave, those who have already returned to work (as well as for the supervisors of such employees), to support their smooth return to the workplace. The seminars for the returnees require the attendance of their partner, in order to provide an opportunity to think together about balancing work and family.

Group work at the career training for young female employeesGroup work at the career training for young female employees

Seminar by an external instructor at the cross-industrial exchange training for female employees Seminar by an external instructor at the cross-industrial exchange training for female employees

Working with spouses in a seminar to support employees returning after child care leaveWorking with spouses in a seminar to support employees returning after child care leave

Activity Example: Increasing the number of female science and engineering majors and provide support for development

A female engineer of Toshiba Corp. talking about the joy of manufacturing at a career eventA female engineer of Toshiba Corp. talking about the joy of manufacturing at a career event

PC disassembly workshopPC disassembly workshop

As a manufacturing company, Toshiba Group engages in activities to increase the number of female students who choose to study science and engineering fields, and to support their development.

In October 2015, Toshiba Corp. held a "PC disassembly workshop" at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin, an all-girls school in Tokyo. With the support of employee volunteers acting the role of disassembling experts, students actually took apart PCs and further learned how electrical products function. Our female engineers also interacted with female junior high students and helped them to create a vision for their future career.

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Recruiting More Non-Japanese Employees and Utilizing Them Effectively

As part of our diversity promotion program, we are increasing the recruitment of non-Japanese employees.

Since 2006, in addition to employing people who have studied in Japan as foreign exchange students, we have been carrying out our Global Recruitment Program in an effort to directly recruit students graduating from foreign universities.

After entering Toshiba, they play active roles in the various fields as sales, development and design. To facilitate their adaptation to life and work in Japan, we provide a wide range of life-related assistance as well as work-related support such as providing each non-Japanese employee with a mentor who provides them with guidance based on a tailor-made job skill improvement plan.

Since FY2011, we have conducted regular assessments of job duties and work environments in order to improve them, presenting good examples from other workplaces. In these assessments, global recruits and their superiors discuss what they each respectively regard as challenges, as well as good methods/means of encouraging foreign national employees to actively involve themselves in their workplaces. Training is also provided for managers and trainers in workplaces receiving those who are newly employed through global recruitment.

Designating prayer rooms

Since FY2013, we have designated prayer rooms and prayer spaces in head quarter and some of our offices, to provide a work environment where employees from diverse cultural backgrounds can work comfortably.

Portal site for assisting those involved with non-Japanese employees

We have set up a portal site on the intranet web page to assist those involved with employees who are foreign nationals. On the portal is basic information, knowhow and more on the subject of employing non-Japanese employees, training on understanding other cultures, and testimonials and case studies concerning accepting non-Japanese employees. This helps cultivate work environments where foreign national employees can work comfortably.

Trends in the number of non-Japanese employees (Toshiba Corp.)

Trends in the number of non-Japanese employees (Toshiba Corp.)

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Employment of People with Disabilities

As of April 1, 2017, the percentage of employees with disabilities has become 2.3% in Toshiba Group in Japan. We have also been making efforts to improve work environments for employees with disabilities. In FY2010, we established a network connecting seven divisions engaged in supporting people with disabilities, including Human Resources and Administration Division and the Design Center. This network has enabled us to devise and implement comprehensive measures to support such employees.

Trends of the employment number of people with disabilities
(Toshiba incl. a special subsidiary company in Japan)
June 2013 June 2014 June 2015 June 2016 June 2017
Number of people 792.5 802.5 822.0 764.0 637.5
Percentage of Employment 2.04% 2.09% 2.03% 2.05% 2.33%
  • * In CSR Report 2016, we presented the percentage of people with disabilities for the Toshiba Group as a whole. However, since FY 2017, our data has been limited to the employment percentage at Toshiba Corporation, and changed in the timing of calculation from April to June. Data for past fiscal years has been corrected accordingly.

A Special Subsidiary Company Toshiba With

Clean-up activities by employees at Toshiba WithClean-up activities by employees at Toshiba With

Toshiba With Corporation was established in February 2005 as a special subsidiary company, which, in accordance with Toshiba's basic policy, aims to employ people with disabilities. It was named "With" in the hope of creating an environment where people with and without disabilities can live and work together.

Currently, 40 employees, most of whom have intellectual disabilities, are working at five business sites of Toshiba Group.

In FY2013, Toshiba With was awarded the Toshiba Corporate Citizenship Award in "Social Contribution by Business" category for its contributions to society through business.

Toshiba With Corporation (Japanese)

Activity Example: Sign language club

On-site lesson, "Let's talk with people who can't hear," at an elementary schoolOn-site lesson, "Let's talk with people who can't hear," at an elementary school

Toshiba Group has been providing employees with a monthly sign language lesson, Toshiba Sign Language Club, since FY2009. At the club, employees with impaired hearing serve as instructors, teaching sign language to facilitate smooth communication and providing information to promote understanding of hearing disabilities. By the end of FY2016, approximately 4,600 people in total have participated in such lessons. Sign Language Club members are engaged in activities outside the company as well. As part of school support programs conducted by Minato Ward in Tokyo, we conduct on-site lessons with the theme "Let's talk with people who can't hear," to teach elementary school children how to communicate with those who are hearing impaired. In FY2016, we conducted the lessons in six classes at three schools. We also invited Ayako Imamura, a movie director with hearing impairments, to a charity presentation of her movie Start Line and donated the proceeds to the Kanagawa Welfare Association of the Deaf.

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Active Utilization of Elderly People

In 2001, amidst the backdrop of the declining birthrate and aging of the society, we established a system to extend the employment of older employees until they reach age 65. Under this system, wage levels are determined according to skills and abilities and employees are expected to provide expertise and knowledge as seasoned professionals.

According to the revised Act on Stabilization of Employment of Elderly Persons enforced in April 2013, we have decided to extend employment opportunities to all persons reaching age 60 in April 2013 or thereafter if they so desire.

We will continue to actively encourage older employees to play active parts in their workplaces according to their work styles, needs, and skills.

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Work-style Innovation (WSI)

Toshiba Corp. is working on activities toward accelerating so-called work-life balance under the unique name of "Work-style Innovation (WSI)." WSI refers to a campaign aimed at creating a positive spiral, where employees work very hard and efficiently and also make the most of their private lives to rejuvenate and improve themselves so that they can add higher value to their work.

At Toshiba Group companies, each employee promotes activities to increase productivity by changing their working styles and methods.

Reduction of Working Hours and Consideration of Scheduled Working Hours

In Toshiba Corp., the average total number of annual actual working hours per employee was 2,076 hours, and the average number of annual non-scheduled working hours per employee was 403 hours in FY2015. Toshiba is making the transition to a style of work that does not depend on overtime work, in order to allow the utilization of diverse personnel, and to promote WSI. We publicly disclose on our intranet site the efforts of each office aiming at reducing overtime work.

Key systems and measures concerning working hours
System/measure Overview
Flexible work system Flextime system
Long Leave System Employee can avail of a maximum of 20-day accumulated leaves for clear and meaningful objectives, such as self-development, social contribution activities, nursing, and also for treatment of non-occupational injuries and diseases, and other conditions including infertility.
"Family Day" initiatives and days set to leave the office at normal quitting time In order to accelerate WSI and create time for employees to spend with their families, employees are prompted to leave work at the official quitting time at least two days during Japan's "Family Week" in November. Special announcements and after-hour patrols will be made to promote awareness during such days.
Enforcing an 8 pm lights-out We extinguish the lights in working areas at 8 pm every day (enacted at the headquarters).
Annual Paid Vacation For the employees' rejuvenation, Toshiba Corp. has been facilitating the planned use of annual paid vacation. In FY2014, percentage of annual paid vacation taken by union members was 83.7%.
Making working hours visible Toshiba Corp. has introduced systems such as "Monitoring Display of Office-Stay Hours" (FY 2009), "Work Record Notification" (FY2010), and "Work Record Display" (FY2010) to increase transparency of working hours.
Addressing long working hours at Toshiba Group workplaces We implement measures in various divisions and business sites to address the problem of long working hours, and publish case examples on our intranet site to spread good practice among departments (e.g. declaring target time (time of leaving work), forbidding employees from coming to work on Sundays, banning late-night overtime in principle, setting "focus hours," and banning meetings outside normal working hours in principle).

Activity Example: Use of the system to make working hours visible

In order to effectively monitor the working conditions of our employees, Toshiba Corp. launched a system that allows employees to visually monitor working hours on their computers (FY 2009). We also started using the systems called Work Record Notification and Work Record Display in order to ensure for employees and their superiors to pay constant attention to work hours (since FY2010).

The Work Record Notification system automatically sends an e-mail to each employee and their superior on the work record of the employee. The Work Record Display system indicates each employee's current work status with three signal colors (red, yellow, and green) to draw attention to overtime work hours.

Supporting employees in balancing work with childcare/nursing care

Since 1990s, Toshiba Group has been supporting employees to balance their work and personal life. Starting in 2005, in accordance with the Law for Measures to Support the Development of the Next Generation, we have implemented various measures and systems, which surpass the legal standards, and continue to make them more adaptable and flexible.

In FY2014, we revised our Hourly-Unit Annual Leave system. Now employees can take leave on a quarterly hour basis instead of hourly when they take a leave over an hour.

The Major Supporting Systems for Employees' Work and Childcare (Toshiba Corp.)
  System Toshiba system As required by law
Childbirth/Child- rearing Childcare leave Period Until the end of the month in which the child turns 3 years old Up to 1 year old except when certain requirements are met
Number of times Up to three times per child Up to once per child
Paternity leave Up to 5 paid holidays (100%) consecutively or separately, within 6 weeks of the birth
Short-time shift Target Employees who are raising children who have not yet completed elementary school Employees who are raising children under three years old
Others 1) No limits to the number of times one can apply
2) Possible to combine with the flextime system
3) Can be set in 15-minute units
Hourly leave system Leave is available in 1-hour units. If more than one hour is taken at a time, however, employees may take leave in 15-minute units*1 for those over an hour.
Family care Family care leave Up to 365 days in total per person requiring nursing care Up to 93 days in total per person requiring nursing care
Hourly leave system Leave is available in 1-hour units. If more than one hour is taken a time, however, employees may take leave in 15-minute units*1 for those over an hour.
Returning to work Subsidies for expenses Allowance for raising the next generation To be provided to each eligible child
* The child being taken care of by the spouse of the applicant, who works for the other company, is also eligible for the allowance.
Welfare system "Teatime" For child-rearing, nursing care, and the purchase of company products, points will be worth 1.2 to 1.5 times the value of normal points.
Mutual understanding program The program offers the opportunity for employees to discuss future career plans and any necessary arrangements with their superior and HR personnel before taking a leave of absence or after resuming work, thus helping to reduce concerns of the employees who take such leaves.
Reemployment system
(return to work system)
Established a system to reemploy employees who had to resign for the following reasons:
1) Resignation in order to accompany a spouse who has been transferred (within 5 years)
2) Resignation in order to provide nursing care for those requiring nursing (within 3 years)
3) Resignation for childbirth, childcare, and raising children (within 3 years)
  • *1 Until FY2013, leave was taken in 1-hour units
Employee Participation of Diverse Working Style Options (Toshiba Corp.)
  FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016
Childcare leave Male: 12
Female: 296
Male: 8
Female: 336
Male: 7
Female: 350
Male: 10
Female: 358
Male: 17
Female: 348
Paternity leave Male: 423 Male: 384 Male: 359 Male: 372 Male: 388
Family-care leave Male: 6
Female: 6
Male: 6
Female: 10
Male: 2
Female: 3
Male: 1
Female: 2
Male: 2
Female: 2
Short-time shift Male: 9
Female: 409
Male: 9
Female: 417
Male: 10
Female: 438
Male: 9
Female: 456
Male: 10
Female: 426

Activity Example: Male employees' active involvement in child-rearing

Noriaki Ichida Industrial ICT Solutions Company Toshiba CorporationNoriaki Ichida
Industrial ICT Solutions Company
Toshiba Corporation

After my first child was born, I took six-months' childcare leave, thanks to which I was able to spend an extremely valuable time with the newborn baby and my wife.

The reason I used this system was that I wanted to watch, together with my wife, the many moments of development that a baby goes through before the age of one. Also, I thought that doing the baby care and housework together with my wife would deepen the love in our family and have a good influence on the baby's growth.

The childcare leave seemed like a long period before I took it, but when it was over it felt like a longish holiday. Thanks to the support of those around me, I was able to return smoothly to my work in developing software technology. I think the enriching feeling of having a new family increased my motivation for work.

Activity Example: Our internal childcare center "Kirame-kids"

In an effort to support Work-style Innovation we opened an internal childcare center named "Kirame-kids Yokohama" on the premises of one of our business sites, Yokohama Complex in FY2011. The center, which has a large garden and abundant greenery, provides full-time high-quality childcare in a relaxed atmosphere and hosts various age-appropriate events for children throughout the year. In FY2016, a child graduated from the nursing program for the fourth time since the opening of the center.

Kirame-kids YokohamaKirame-kids Yokohama

Handmade signboardHandmade signboard

Raising Awareness

In order to spread the concept of Work-Style Innovation and put it into practice, we raise awareness through various means such as training programs and distributing brochures.

Key awareness-raising measures concerning Work-style Innovation
System/Measure Target Overview
Time management training Toshiba Group companies in Japan Learning how to work efficiently and managing subordinates' time, as part of training programs at based on levels.
Nursing care seminars Toshiba Group companies in Japan Nursing care seminars (held in FY2016 at 27 business sites)
Informational materials concerning Work-Style Innovation
Title Contents
"Easy! How-To Guide for our nursing care support system"
(from FY2010 onward)
A handbook that provides information on the various plans supporting family/nursing care so as to help balance work and family care.
"Easy! How-to Guide for our nurturing support system"
(from FY2008 onward)
An easy-to-understand brochure on systems designed to support working mothers and fathers from pregnancy through to their return to work, including necessary procedures (being distributed to eligible employees).

Activity Example: Nursing care seminar

Nursing care seminar at Tokyo HDQNursing care seminar at Tokyo HDQ

Due to changes in family compositions and increase of two-income households, an increasing percentage of employees are expected to take care of elderly family members while working full time. In FY2012, Toshiba conducted a fact-finding survey on nursing care, which revealed a strong need for information on nursing care among employees. As a result, we held nursing care seminars by sites from FY2014.

Benefits

Toshiba Corporate Pension Plan: For our employees' lives after retirement, we have the Toshiba Corporate Pension Plan (defined benefit plan), in addition to their old-age pension from Japan's welfare pension insurance scheme. In October 2015, we also introduced a defined contribution pension, in order to improve employees' post-retirement funds still more.

Teatime, a selective welfare system*: Toshiba offers a selective welfare system called "Teatime" under which employees can make choices according to their needs and receive subsidiaries from a wide range of welfare benefits. The system also covers support for childcare and nursing care, including costs for day-care centers, child-rearing, education, and nursing care.

  • * Following FY2016, we are postponing providing welfare benefits in FY2017 as well.

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