Global

Home > Environment > Greening of Process > Mitigation of Climate Change: Reducing Energy-derived CO2 Emissions 

Environment

Committed to People, Committed to the Future.

Reducing Energy-derived CO2 Emissions

Results of FY2015

Under the Fifth Environmental Action Plan, in order to assess CO2 emissions measures consisting mainly of those for electricity conservation, the Group uses energy-derived CO2 emissions per unit production by fixing the CO2 emission coefficient to FY2010. The amount of CO2 actually emitted in FY2015 was 2.60 million tons (an increase of 480,000 tons compared to the FY2010 level), a substantial increase which was greatly affected by the deterioration of the CO2 emission coefficient for electricity due to the Great East Japan Earthquake; however, as a result of initiatives to reduce power consumption mainly through energy-saving investments, proactive electricity conservation, and production adjustments, Toshiba Group was able to reduce energy-related CO2 emissions per unit production to 80% of the FY2010 level, 10 percentage points higher than the initial goal.

To Top

Future initiatives

In order to meet growing market demand, Toshiba Group plans to introduce facilities, mainly those for manufacturing semiconductors. Therefore, energy-derived CO2 emissions are likely to increase in the near future. The Group will continue its efforts to reduce CO2 emissions per unit production by 9% compared to the FY2010 level in FY2016 by adopting a variety of energy-saving measures, including performing energy-saving diagnoses and investing in energy-saving facilities.

Changes in energy-derived CO2 emissions per unit production
[Image] Changes in energy-derived CO2 emissions per unit production

*
The CO2 emissions coefficient for electricity is used to calculate energy-derived CO2 emissions (in Japan: 3.50 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2010, 4.76 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2011, 4.87 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2012, 5.70 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2013, 5.54 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2014, and 5.10 t-CO2/10,000 kWh in FY2015). Overseas electricity is based on the GHG Protocol.
*2
The coefficient of electricity for sites in Japan is fixed to that of FY2010.

Breakdown of energy-derived CO2 emissions (FY2015)
[Image] Breakdown of energy-derived CO2 emissions

To Top

Case Study: Visualizing power energy consumption per basic unit

Toshiba Corporation Yokkaichi Operations

At Yokkaichi Operations, which manufactures memory products, the optimal energy supply constantly changes due to large load fluctuations resulting from production increases and other factors. Therefore, we manage production in terms of efficiency per basic unit and assess the optimal supply based on changes in supply per basic unit.

To further improve efficiency, we are working to visualize power energy consumption per basic unit. If energy efficiency decreases, an alert e-mail is sent to concerned parties, thereby enabling the reduction of time required to notice the situation. If efficiency per basic unit decreases, we analyze the data in detail by using an assortment of statistical tools in order to identify the cause of the decrease. Combining visualization with data analysis makes it possible to improve efficiency and helps reduce GHG emissions.

[Image] If efficiency per basic unit exceeds the upper or lower limit, an alert e-mail is sent automatically.

To Top

Case Study: Initiative at the Service Information Center

Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corporation

[Image] Initiative at the Service Information Center

The Service Information Center, which remotely monitors elevators and escalators, uses multiple server centers for Business Continuity Planning (BCP).

In the past, the center simultaneously operated two server centers. However, the new Service Information Center operates only a single server center on an ongoing basis; the other center is in stand-by mode. In an emergency, the Center will switch to the other server center, thereby reducing CO2 emissions by 21 t-CO2/ year without changing BCP procedures.

To Top

Case Study: Recovery of waste heat from plant wastewater

Iwate Toshiba Electronics Co., Ltd.

Partly because it is located in a cold district, Iwate Toshiba Electronics Co., Ltd. is working to recover various kinds of waste heat because the plant requires more heat, particularly in winter.

As part of measures to further recover waste heat, the company noted the fact that plant wastewater during treatment, which has a temperature of 21°C or more throughout the year, became a greater thermal source than outside air in winter, so the company worked to recover waste heat by taking advantage of this difference.

Since there was the possibility that particulates in plant wastewater might stick to the heat exchanger, workers made effective use of the heat exchanger by applying ingenious schemes. Thus, the company was able to reduce CO2 emissions by 505 tons annually.

[Image] Recovery of waste heat from plant wastewater

To Top