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Conservation of Biodiversity

In order to prevent biodiversity loss on a global scale, Toshiba Group will establish a system to promote its initiatives and visualize the effects of its business activities on biodiversity.

Toshiba Group is carrying out biodiversity conservation activities at 67 locations worldwide.

[Image] Conservation of Biodiversity
* Explained in detail “Ex-situ conservation of rare flora and fauna”.

Biodiversity Guidelines

Toshiba Group formulated the Biodiversity Guidelines in September 2009. The Group will strive to make its initiatives for preserving biodiversity visible by analyzing its business activities and diverse environmental issues, including biodiversity, in comprehensive, quantitative terms and thus reduce environmental impacts and utilize ecosystem services in a sustainable manner.

Toshiba Group Biodiversity Guidelines

Basic policy

In order to conserve biodiversity and promote the sustainable use of biological resources that constitute biodiversity, Toshiba Group will implement the following measures:

  • Analysis of the impact of our business activities on biodiversity
  • Reduction of the impact on biodiversity and the sustainable use of resources through our business operations
  • Development of an organizational framework to promote these measures

Specific actions

  1. We will take appropriate measures to protect ecosystems when building factories or relocating facilities.
  2. We will collaborate with local public agencies and private organizations.
  3. We will continue our commitment to corporate citizenship activities as members of a sustainable society.
  4. We will assess the impact and effects of environmental measures on various aspects of the environment, including biodiversity.
  5. We will promote initiatives for the conservation of biodiversity in supply chains, including the mining of resources.
  6. We will assess the impact of substance emissions and the consumption of resources required for our business activities.
  7. We will study the structures and systems of nature and make technological contributions to society in accordance with the characteristics of our businesses.

Annual Plan

2015 target

Toshiba Group aims to minimize the adverse effects of its business activities on biodiversity and shift its biodiversity policy toward initiatives for improvement to realize an ideal state of environmental management in 2015.

These efforts aim to stop the decreases in the kinds of biodiversity that each site has decided to protect by 2015 and allow for such biodiversity to increase in subsequent years.

Minimizing Adverse Effects and Increasing Biodiversity (Conceptual Diagram)
[Image] Minimizing Adverse Effects and Increasing Biodiversity (Conceptual Diagram)

The global Aichi Target adopted at the Tenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP10) held in Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture, in October 2010 require all signatories to start increasing biodiversity by 2020.

Toshiba Group plans to achieve the Aichi Target about five years ahead of schedule.

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Medium-term plan for the period up to 2015

To achieve the 2015 target, Toshiba Group aims to develop biotopes at 67 of its business and production sites worldwide.

[Image] Medium-term plan for the period up to 2015

Development of biotopes will be promoted in three steps: biodiversity surveys, selection of metrics and measurement of effects. Biodiversity surveys consist of investigations of living organisms and "red lists" in the environs of business sites, explorations of biodiversity by experts, and assessments of biodiversity potential at such sites and in neighboring areas.

Based on this survey data, Toshiba Group will select living organisms to serve as metrics, take measures to protect and increase them, and make periodic measurements of effects, thereby verifying the appropriateness of the biotope development process. Under the medium-term plan, the Group will take these steps at a minimum of 34 of its sites (50%) each year.

Medium-term plan

FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015
50% of sites surveyed 100% of sites
surveyed
50% of sites have
selected metrics
100% of sites have
selected metrics
50% of sites have
measured effects
100% of sites have
measured effects

*50% = 34 or more sites

Steps in biotope development

[Image] Medium-term plan for the period up to 2015

Survey Investigate organisms living on the premises; investigate IUCN and local area Red Lists; onsite inspection by local experts; assessment of biodiversity potential for targeted and neighboring areas.
Select metrics Select relevant metrics on the basis of investigation data; devise measures to protect and expand the selected metrics.
Measure Measure the metrics on a periodic basis. Examples of measurement targets: Number of species of animals, number of animals within each species, number of plant roots, size of planting area.
Improve Improvement or enhancement in metrics achieved as a result of periodic measuring.

Toshiba Group definition of a production site biotope

Establishment of ecosystem networks centered on production sites Establishment of habitats or resting places for birds, dragonflies, butterflies, and other living organisms, regardless of their rarity, in the areas surrounding production sites
Ex-situ conservation of rare flora and fauna Protecting and breeding rare flora and fauna in the areas surrounding production sites on-site before returning them to their native habitats
*
Rare flora and fauna: A species on the Red List or other species of wildlife specified by local government or regional experts.

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Results for FY2012

In FY2012, Toshiba Group conducted biodiversity surveys at 54 of its 67 sites covered by the project, and the percentage of sites surveyed was 81%, significantly exceeding the initial target of 50%. By region, the percentage was 100% for Asia (excluding Japan and China), the Americas, and Europe; the percentages for Japan and China were 83% (eight sites not surveyed) and 55% (five sites), respectively. In FY2013, Toshiba Group will complete biodiversity surveys at the 13 remaining sites.

The 54 sites that have been surveyed will select metrics based on their survey results and gradually carry out biodiversity protection activities.

Region Eligible sites No. of sites
surveyed
% of sites
surveyed
Total 67 54 81%
Japan 48 40 83%
China 11 6 55%
Asia 3 3 100%
Americas 3 3 100%
Europe 2 2 100%

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Initiatives at production sites

Establishment of ecosystem networks centered on production sites

Land use is one human activity that has an adverse effect on ecosystems. Residential land and factories destroy the living environments of plants and animals and disrupt wildlife corridors. Therefore, Toshiba Group aims to establish ecosystem networks that connect production sites with their neighboring areas.

Toshiba calls for employees who cultivate fruits such as yuzu (Citrus junos) and sudachi (Citrus sudachi) in their home gardens to allow some of the larvae of the swallowtail butterflies living on their leaves to grow until they mature into adults rather than eradicating all of them. Toshiba also distributes yuzu seedlings free of charge to employees who want them. We believe that we can contribute to expanding butterflies' habitats by calling them into our employees' home gardens.

Plants (eaten by butterflies) Butterflies expected to be called in (example)
Yuzu and sudachi (citrons) Asian swallowtail, spangle, and great Mormon
Kumquat Asian swallowtail, spangle, and Chinese peacock

[Image] Citrons
Citrons

[Image] Asian swallowtail (caterpillar)
Asian swallowtail (caterpillar)

[Image] Asian swallowtail (imago)
Asian swallowtail (imago)

Additionally, the company plans to develop yuzu orchards in part of the green space at each of its production sites and make it a shelter for butterfly eggs laid in employees' home gardens and larvae that hatch from the eggs.

In the future, Toshiba aims to minimize the number of larvae eradicated at homes and establish an ecosystem network for butterflies that connects employees' homes, local forests, rivers, parks, and so forth with the company's production sites as its core.

Establishing a network for butterflies that connects employees' homes, neighboring parks, forests, rivers, and so forth with production sites as its core
[Image] Establishing a network for butterflies that connects employees' homes, neighboring parks, forests, rivers, and so forth with production sites as its core

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Case Study 1: Toshiba Komukai Complex

The Komukai Complex aims to establish an ecosystem network that connects Keio University and Yumemigasaki Park to the west and Tama River to the north. A pond in the courtyard of the complex was transformed into a habitat for dragonflies, and now Jomon (ancient) lotuses* are grown there.

[Image] Example1 Toshiba Komukai Complex

The pond was repaired to have three levels of depth: 0.00, 10, and 65 cm. The complex aims to offer diverse pond habitats by making different levels of depth available: 0.00 cm for Jomon lotuses, 10 cm for dragonfly nymphs, and 65 cm for dragonflies.

[Image] Jomon lotus
Jomon lotus

*
The Jomon lotus sprouted from a more than 2,000-year-old seed of a lotus excavated from relics in Chiba City in 1951. It is considered to be the world's oldest flower. So far, its roots have been divided and distributed to various parts of Japan and the rest of the world, and the Jomon lotus has been designated by Chiba Prefecture as a natural monument.

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Case Study 2: Toshiba Information Equipment (Hangzhou) Co., Ltd.

Toshiba Information Equipment (Hangzhou) conducted a survey of the ecosystem in the local community where it operates. The Hangzhou Bay wetland to the east is one of the world's treasure troves of migratory birds, which travel between Siberia and Australia via East Asia. Many migratory birds can be observed even in the environs of the company's production site as they fly in from the Qiantang River and wetland parks in eastern Hangzhou.

In the future, the company will continue to step up efforts to establish an ecosystem network with its neighboring areas mainly by conserving the willow groves at its production site.

[Image] Example2 Toshiba Information Equipment (Hangzhou) Co., Ltd.

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Ex-situ conservation of rare flora and fauna

Toshiba Group is promoting an ex-situ conservation* initiative as stipulated in Article 9 of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

*
Measures taken for the recovery and rehabilitation of threatened species and for their reintroduction into their original habitats under appropriate conditions as well as measures taken for the purpose of complementing in-situ measures (as stipulated in Article 8 of the Convention) aiming to conserve such threatened species within their original habitats.

Case Study 3: Toshiba Keihin Product Operations

Japanese eight-barbel loaches are protected within an unused pond at the site. Plans call for these loaches to be returned to Tsurumi River, their original habitat, in the future after they have grown up in the pond.

[Image] Japanese eight-barbel loach (Listed as endangered by the Ministry of the Environment)
Japanese eight-barbel loach
(Listed as endangered by the Ministry of
the Environment)

[Image] Raised in an unused pond
Raised in an unused pond

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Case Study 4: Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp.

Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp. transplanted daylilies, which are excessively picked in the Koajiro forest of Miura Peninsula, to an open space on-site at the company and succeeded in blooming them. As their seedlings increase in the future, the company will re-plant them in the forest.

[Image] Transplanted to an open space at Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp.
Transplanted to an open space at
Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp.

[Image] Blooming daylilies
Blooming daylilies

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Case Study 5: Buzen Toshiba Electronics Corp.

The company works to conserve Mikekado pumpkins around its production site in cooperation with civic groups.

[Image] Cultivating and harvesting pumpkins in cooperation with local elementary schools
Cultivating and harvesting pumpkins
in cooperation with local elementary schools

[Image] Mikekado pumpkin
Mikekado pumpkin

Tradition says that what are now called Mikekado pumpkins were first brought by the Portuguese to the Mikekado area in Buzen City, Fukuoka Prefecture, via Oita Prefecture over 400 years ago. They are said to be the oldest type of introduced pumpkins in Japan.

Since the Mikekado pumpkin, which retains the color, shape, and taste of the ones brought to Japan in the 17th century, is valuable culturally, activities are being carried out to preserve this vegetable and hand it down to future generations.

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Case Study 6: Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

The presence of many endangered species, such as Tokyo daruma pond frogs, great purple emperors, Ascalaphus ramburi, and Japanese grass lizards has been confirmed at the company's production site and in neighboring areas. The company is striving to survey and protect these living organisms with the aim of creating an environment in which as many of them as possible may live.

Species covered by "red lists," the existence of which has been confirmed at the site and in neighboring areas (examples)

[Image] Ascalaphus ramburi (Species designated by Tochigi Prefecture as requiring attention)
Ascalaphus ramburi
(Species designated by Tochigi Prefecture
as requiring attention)

[Image] Great purple emperor (Species designated by the Ministry of the Environment as near threatened)
Great purple emperor
(Species designated by the Ministry of
the Environment as near threatened)

[Image] Ricciocarpus natans (Species designated by the Ministry of the Environment as near threatened)
Ricciocarpus natans
(Species designated by the Ministry of
the Environment as near threatened)

[Image] Northern goshawk (Species designated by the Ministry of the Environment as near threatened)
Northern goshawk
(Species designated by the Ministry of
the Environment as near threatened)

[Image] Tokyo daruma pond frog (Species designated by the Ministry of the Environment as near threatened)
Tokyo daruma pond frog
(Species designated by the Ministry of
the Environment as near threatened)

[Image] Plestiodon japonicus (Species designated by Tochigi Prefecture as endangered type Ⅱ)
Plestiodon japonicus
(Species designated by Tochigi Prefecture
as endangered type Ⅱ)

Confirmed insects (examples)

[Image] Cetonia pilifera
Cetonia pilifera

[Image] Indian fritillary
Indian fritillary

[Image] Sympetrum infuscatum
Sympetrum infuscatum

Natural environment within the site and in neighboring areas

[Image] Plants at the production site that are home to snakes and lizards
Plants at the production site that are
home to snakes and lizards

[Image] Large birds fly over above plant communities in a field that has been abandoned and left uncultivated
Large birds fly over above plant communities
in a field that has been abandoned
and left uncultivated

[Image] Grassy area
Grassy area

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Case Study 7: Toshiba Information Equipment (Philippines), Inc.

The company strives to conserve five endangered species, including narra, white lauan, and ipil trees, in the environs of its production site and distributes seeds of these trees to nearby schools and suppliers to increase the number of ex-situ conservation sites.

[Image] Narra
Narra

[Image] White lauan
White lauan

[Image] Ipil tree
Ipil tree

Narra, the national tree of the Philippines, once grew throughout the country, but owing to excessive felling, it is now designated as an endangered species. Narra trees were felled mainly because they were highly valuable as construction materials; it is said that many of the felled trees were exported to Japan.

It is highly significant that Toshiba Information Equipment (Philippines), a Japanese-affiliated company, protects narra and expands narra forests.

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Range of travel of plants and animals in ex-situ conservation

In order to ensure ex-situ conservation, it is necessary to pay attention to the range of travel of plants and animals. For example, it is not desirable to protect Hokkaido's endangered species at a factory in Kyushu, which has a different climate and living environment. How far, then, can endangered species be transferred?

One guideline is to keep them within a river basin. "Basin" refers to the area of land where rivers catch the rain that falls and can be considered to be a single unit of an ecosystem. Therefore, Toshiba Group has a principle of moving plants and animals within the same basin when its business and production sites do so for the purpose of ex-situ conservation.

In Japan, 109 first-class rivers and their valleys occupy about 70% of the country's land, and Toshiba Group has confirmed which valley each of its domestic businesses and production sites are located in. Also at its business and production sites outside Japan, the Group promotes ex-situ conservation as necessary while referring to maps of basins and vegetation distribution charts for each region, marshland characteristics, and other data as well as paying attention to ecosystem units.

Map of basins of first-class rivers
[Image] Map of basins of first-class rivers
Source: Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism

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Significance of promoting ex-situ conservation in production site environs

Toshiba Group considers corporate production sites to be suitable for ex-situ conservation for two reasons. First, such sites can be managed by employees. Second, it is less likely that endangered species will be stolen or excessively hunted by third parties or that they will be eaten by natural predators or introduced invasive species.

In in-situ conservation*, which is widely practiced today to conserve biodiversity, it is difficult to carry out nature conservation activities and perform management work on the spot every day. At production sites, however, employees can take care of and observe plants and animals on a daily basis and detect any abnormalities early on. In addition, since security is maintained at production sites, there is practically no risk of endangered species being stolen by third parties or eaten due to unintended growth in populations of organisms such as raccoons or deer. From the viewpoint of conserving biodiversity, corporate production sites can become reserves for extremely important plants and animals.

*
In-situ conservation (Article 8 of the Convention on Biological Diversity) refers to activities to conserve the ecosystem as a whole. Examples include conservation of forests through afforestation and thinning, preservation of satoyama, cleaning of rivers, and management of tidal flats. "Nature conservation activities" usually refer to in-situ conservation as defined above.

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Toward mainstreaming biodiversity

Since the need to conserve biodiversity is less well known than the needs to address climate change and waste management, efforts are underway to make biodiversity conservation a mainstream part of environmental activities around the world.

In general, mentioning biodiversity conservation may remind one of, say, protecting the tropical rainforests in the Amazon valley or preserving satoyama far from urban areas. When working to establish an ecosystem network with business and production sites as the core and to conserve rare flora and fauna ex-situ, Toshiba Group attempts to carry out straightforward initiatives that are close to its employees and their families as well as to local residents so that they can work on such initiatives together. Toshiba Group believes that allowing people to make contact with nature and touch living organisms in their daily lives, whether they are in office districts, residential areas, or industrial zones, leads to a change in biodiversity awareness, which in turn provides a shortcut to mainstreaming biodiversity.

Human society benefits from ecosystems; these blessings from nature are known as "ecosystem services." Ecosystem services can be divided into three broad categories: provisioning, regulating, and cultural.

Ecosystem services
Ecosystem
services
(1) Provisioning services Supply of materials such as food, water, wood and fuel
(2) Regulating services Waste decomposition, water purification and weather regulation
(3) Cultural services Recreation as well as spiritual, cultural and intellectual benefits

In order to maintain and improve provisioning and regulating services, it is necessary to protect nature and ensure in-situ conservation. At the same time, Toshiba Group aims to contribute to cultural services with the two policies it is advancing. Further, the Group believes that enhancing these cultural services is the most essential ingredient to accelerate the mainstreaming of biodiversity globally in the future.

Going forward, Toshiba Group will continue striving to conserve biodiversity around the world in cooperation with a wide range of stakeholders.

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Biodiversity conservation through local collaboration

At Toshiba Group, we are promoting biodiversity conservation activities in collaboration with local stakeholders and governments. For example, Mr. Yuji Kishi, Professor Emeritus at the Keio University in Tokyo and representative of TR Net, a non-profit organization (NPO), advises us on our initiative targeting the Tsurumi River watershed. As for ex-situ conservation of daylilies at Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp., we collaborate with Kanagawa Prefecture, which owns the Koajiro forest. Going forward, we will continue to promote biodiversity conservation activities in collaboration with local experts and interested parties

Tsurumi River Basin Networking (TR Net;NPO)

[Image] Survey of a production site conducted by Prof. Yuji Kishi, Representative (right)
Survey of a production site conducted by Prof. Emeritus Yuji Kishi, Representative (right)

[Image] Logo of TR Net (NPO)
http://www.tr-net.gr.jp/

(Japanese site)

An NPO represented by Professor Emeritus Yuji Kishi of the Keio University Faculty of Economics. TR Net has conducted a study on the ecosystem and implemented conservation projects at the Tsurumi River watershed for more than 20 years.

[Image] Tsurumi River Basin Networking (NPO) Representative Director Professor Emeritus of Keio University Mr. Yuji Kishi
Tsurumi River Basin
Networking (NPO)
Representative Director
Professor Emeritus of
Keio University
Mr. Yuji Kishi

In other words, mainstreaming biodiversity means that all individuals and organizations confirm the crisis of and hope for biodiversity in their daily lives and business activities, find ways of contributing to conservation and reconstruction, and implement these on a daily basis. The potentials of production sites are drastically being reconsidered today from this new perspective. For example, a review of production sites in the context of vast expanses of land (ecosystems) such as nearby river systems and their basins indicates that each site is a party to the crisis and represents hope for its ecosystem because it is an important part of the ecosystem and fulfills a role unique to the area where it is located. Also, it is a focus of great expectation and hope as a new place that provides a living environment to neighboring organisms that can fly, or as a candidate for ex-situ conservation for those which are endangered in the local ecosystem and cannot fly. Furthermore, nature reserves of corporate sites are characteristically managed strictly because they are placed under rigorous security management. If we just realize this, the logical conclusion is that corporate sites can be centers of hope for the conservation and restoration of biodiversity in the ecological spaces (including river systems and their valleys, hills, etc.) where they are located.

The biodiversity crisis will be overcome through diverse ways and means when individuals and organizations figure out, in all aspects of their daily lives and business activities, and recognize this as a challenge that they should solve and take action for on their own initiative in cooperation with their local communities. I sincerely hope that Toshiba, which has brilliantly realized this simple, clear, and powerful truth and started a local and global biotope strategy, will play an active role in mainstreaming biodiversity.

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Internalization of the biodiversity potential assessment method

Assessing the areas surrounding production sites is essential for implementing initiatives at the sites. Toshiba and InterRisk Research Institute & Consulting, Inc. have jointly developed a simplified version of the biodiversity potential assessment method that can be conducted by production site staff. We regularly hold one-day internal training courses on this method. By attending one of these training courses, employees can learn about the biodiversity potential assessment method as well as acquire basic knowledge and the latest trends related to biodiversity.

[Image] The condition of the natural resources (wooded areas and river systems) located within a 2-km radius of each site is quantified in terms of points by using aerial photographs and literature.

[Image] Biodiversity training
Biodiversity training

[Image] Mr. Makoto Haraguchi of InterRisk Research Institute & Consulting, Inc.
Mr. Makoto Haraguchi of InterRisk Research Institute & Consulting, Inc.

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Wastewater management using the WET method

Toshiba Group uses the Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) method, which employs biological indicators, on a trial basis as a new way of investigating the impact of wastewater from its production sites on the environment. This method, which confirms the impact of chemical substances in wastewater on the environment as the magnitude of the overall impact on living organisms, has already been introduced in Europe and North America. With the cooperation of the National Institute for Environmental Studies, investigators at the Yokohama Complex used four organisms of species −luminescent bacteria, algae, crustaceans (water fleas) and fish (zebra fish) −to conduct short-term chronic toxicity tests referring to U.S. guidelines.

In FY2010, Toshiba Group carried out these tests at five production sites, including the Toshiba Yokohama Complex, which were chosen from among the various industries in which it operates. No substantial impact of wastewater on the ecosystem was observed at any site. In the future, the Group plans to continue periodically investigating the status of wastewater management.

[Image] Water flea (left) and zebra fish (right)
Water flea (left) and zebra fish (right) used to assess wastewater (photos courtesy of the National Institute for Environmental Studies)

[Image] Sampling of wastewater
Sampling of wastewater

  • Lagoon report(TOSHIBA Facebook (Japanese) A new window will open.)

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Positioning of biodiversity in LIME

Toshiba Group makes use of the Japanese version of the Life-cycle Impact assessment Method based on Endpoint modeling (LIME), developed by the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, to assess the effects of its business operations on biodiversity. The LIME method expresses the effects of resources consumed for business activities and chemical substances discharged from them on human society and the ecosystem as coefficients. In order to assess the effects on biodiversity, damage caused to four affected areas (ecological toxicity, land use, resource consumption, and waste) is quantified to calculate the Expected Increase in Number of Extinct Species (EINES), an indicator of how much extinction risks for the Red List of endangered species increase. This enables quantitative analysis of material input and output associated with business activities as a direct indicator of effects on endangered species.

Assessment of using the LIME method
[Image] Assessment of using the LIME method

Map of the relationship between business and biodiversity
[Image] Map of the relationship between business and biodiversity

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Case Study

Assessment of products’ effects on biodiversity

Toshiba Group assesses its products’ effects on biodiversity using the Japanese version of the Life-cycle Impact assessment Method based on Endpoint modeling (LIME), which allows for comprehensive assessments from four perspectives: (1) human health, (2) biodiversity, (3) social assets and (4) primary production. It is also developing products that contribute to conserving biodiversity.

Analysis of LIME assessments
[Image] Analysis of LIME assessments

Spectroscopic properties of E-CORE, our LED lamp model designed to reduce UV radiation
[Image] Spectroscopic properties of E-CORE, our LED lamp model designed to reduce UV radiation

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Case Study in 2009

Example of LIME assessments: Electric power substations

[Image] 「145kV GIS」のイメージ
145kV GIS

Some electric power substations are built in mountainous regions covered with rich green foliage. Toshiba Group uses the LIME method to assess environmental impact reduction effects obtained when reducing the area of installation for substations with old air-insulated switchgears (AIS) and that for substations with 145 kV gas-insulated switchgears (GIS). GIS substations, which require only 1/30 of the installation area for AIS substations, reduce the integrated LIME assessment indicator to 20% of the level of AIS substations because the effects of land use (modification of forests), disposal of concrete for the foundation, and so forth are reduced substantially. In particular, it is found that the effects of GIS substations on biodiversity are reduced to 10% of the level of AIS substations.

Comparison of integrated LIME assessments of substations
[Image] Comparison of integrated LIME assessments of substations

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Supply chain initiatives

In addition to conventional green procurement, procuring raw materials in consideration of the ecosystem will be one important element of future biodiversity conservation initiatives. Toshiba is working to develop tools that can be applied to assess the effects of procured materials.

Index of Mining Impact on Biodiversity (MiBiD™)

Toshiba Group has developed the MiBiD™ method to quantify the impacts of materials that constitute its products on the biodiversity of areas adjacent to mines when they are extracted. The Group has created a database of minerals extracted from mines around the world that records the relationships between the production scale of the mines and the surrounding reserves and vegetation using MiBiD/kg as the base unit. Until recently, this method covered iron, copper, and aluminum, which are all used in large quantities globally and indispensable to electric products, and now the MiBiD database includes zinc and lead as well. Application of MiBiD™ may enable us to procure materials while taking mining's effects on biodiversity into consideration. In order to identify the mines from which materials used for products and at business and production sites are procured, it is essential to obtain supply-chain information (e.g., the names of mines from which materials are extracted and the amounts of minerals used). Toshiba Group believes that in the future, if an environment that enables us to obtain such information becomes available, MiBiD™ will contribute to building our supply chain while taking biodiversity into consideration.

Flow of processes
from mining to products

[Image] Flow of processes from mining to products

Example of calculating the MiBiD base unit (MiBiD/kg) for each mine
[Image] Example of calculating the MiBiD base unit (MiBiD/kg) for each mine
Note: MiBiD™: Index of Mining Impact on Biodiversity

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Contributions to society

Toshiba Group's 1.5 Million Tree-Planting Project contributes to realizing ecosystems that are suitable for the growth of various organisms by pruning and thinning trees for proper forest management. Furthermore, the Group provides human resource development services for those who love nature, such as tree-planting events for employees, nature observation programs and training for nature observation instructors.

[Image] Nature observation program
Nature observation program

[Image] Afforestation
Afforestation

Forest thinning with local governments and NGOs

In May 2009, Toshiba Group entered into a comprehensive agreement on cooperation in forest development with Aomori Prefecture. Toshiba is working with Aomori Prefecture to develop a total of about 10.5 ha of forest land in Shichinohe Town and Misawa City and is using the land as a place for the environmental education of employees. It also makes the most of the Forest Neighborhood Association system* promoted by an environmental NPO to have paper manufacturers process wood generated by tree thinning in Misawa City then produce paper from the processed wood and use the paper for copying and printing pamphlets and other materials. In March 2010, some 63 tons of wood were produced from forest thinning. Toshiba Group uses such wood for the printing of its own environmental reports and other materials. Thus the Group will contribute to the realization of a recycling-oriented society by not only helping to thin forests but also effectively using timber from forest thinning.

*
A new tree thinning promotion system implemented by the environmental NPO Office Neighborhood Association, which aims to create a link between forest developers and businesses in order to establish a connection between tree thinning and the use of thinned trees.

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