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Social Contribution Activities


Electronics Disassembly Workshops

photo of Electronics Disassembly Workshops
photo of Electronics Disassembly Workshops

Toshiba hold workshops wherein children take apart household appliances and personal computers. Our purpose is to let children experience how interesting and mysterious science is, and feel the fun of manufacturing.
As volunteer Toshiba Group employees who take part as the "Disassembly Doctors" give guidance in how to use tools and how the product mechanisms work, the children proceed to disassemble products that are no longer usable for shop displays or other such purposes. The children start out being assigned problems by the Doctors so that they can be aware of the operation of the parts as they proceed with the disassembly. After they have taken the products apart, they separate out the materials by plastic, metal, and so on, to also learn about recycling.
These workshops were held a total of 26 times from 2005 to the end of FY2012.
The employee volunteers have also started a Disassembly Workshop Promotion Working Group that has been discussing improvements to the program and explanatory methods that the children will find easier to understand.

Let's Try Disassembling a Vacuum Cleaner

photo of Let's Try Disassembling a Vacuum Cleaner

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Where do these parts go? What do they do?

Vacuum cleaner

photo of Vacuum cleaner

Microwave oven

photo of Microwave oven

Personal computer

photo of Personal computer

DVD recorder

photo of DVD recorder

*The parts in the photographs are only for the purpose of illustration, and are not to be taken for actual parts.

Answer: Come to the Disassembly Workshop and ask a Disassembly Doctor.

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Results of Sessions Held in FY2012

January 19, 2013  "Shibaura Experimental Laboratory" Open Techno Kids Public Lecture at Shibaura Institute of Technology

photo of Trying to make a motor run after removing it
Trying to make a motor run after removing it

Microwave ovens, vacuum cleaners, personal computers, and DVD players were disassembled by 38 primary school students from fourth to sixth grade in teams of two. In addition to 19 "Disassembly Doctors," three students from Shibaura Institute of Technology also joined in as Doctors-in-training.
The children start out being given assignments by the Doctors to find certain parts. This helps them to be aware of the operation of the parts as they proceed with the disassembly. After they have taken the products apart, the children present their favorite parts to the others as a way of reviewing and furthering their understanding.


  • photo of The assigned problem part is found---but what does it do?

    The assigned problem part is found
    ---but what does it do?

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December 15, 2012  "Disassembly Workshop for Moms and Kids" at Eco-Products 2012

We held the workshop in the event "Eco-Products 2012" at Tokyo Big Sight, with the cooperation of ecomom magazine that features "Lifestyles that are Kind to Families and Nature" as its main topic. Under the guidance of 20 "Disassembly Doctors," 15 teams of elementary school children and their mothers (ecomom readers) took on the challenge of disassembling a cyclone-type vacuum cleaner. As one of the Doctors explained that the capsule-like part enclosing the motor was made from recycled plastic, the children listened in fascination.

  • photo of Screwdriver operation was clumsy at first, but grew smooth with practice

    Screwdriver operation was clumsy at first, but grew smooth with practice

  • photo of A good time was had with Mom

    A good time was had with Mom

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November 3, 2012  Setagaya Lifestyle Design Center at Setagaya Arts Center

photo of A disassembled microwave oven
A disassembled microwave oven

Third to sixth grade elementary school students paired with a parent in 23 teams disassembled microwave ovens, vacuum cleaners, personal computers, and DVD players. After hearing an explanation of the difference between disassembly and destruction, they started in on disassembly with support from 22 "Disassembly Doctors." The teams could often be seen stopping in the middle of disassembly to ask a Disassembly Doctor about something they didn't understand. After they finished the disassembly, they all received certificates of completion and briefly related their impressions of the program.


  • photo of What might this be?

    What might this be?

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August 18, 2012  Children's Science Exploration Team

A disassembly workshop was held at the Toshiba Science Museum as a program of the Children's Science Exploration Team organized by Kanagawa Prefecture Council to Promote Young People's Experience of Science and Kanagawa Prefectural Youth Center. Eighteen elementary school students in fourth to sixth grade and 12 "Disassembly Doctors" together took on the challenge of disassembling microwave ovens, vacuum cleaners, and personal computers. At the end, the children talked about what they had learned from disassembling these objects, and what they want to teach their friends about it, indicating that the program had succeeded in giving the children a deeper understanding of manufactured products.

  • photo of Telling the group about the mechanism of the keyboard

    Telling the group about the
    mechanism of the keyboard

    photo of Microwave oven disassembly under way!

    Microwave oven disassembly
    under way!

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July 14, 2012  Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Term Corporation: "Give a Thought to the Environment and Recycling"

Term Corporation, which is a Toshiba Group company, organized this special event as part of the "Give a Thought to the Environment and Recycling" celebrations for the 50th anniversary of its establishment. Elementary school students from fourth to sixth grade in Saiwai Ward of Kawasaki City paired with their parents in teams. In morning and afternoon sessions of 10 teams each, they disassembled DVD recorders. At the end of the sessions, they learned about recycling and separated out the materials from the products they had disassembled.
Typical impressions included "It was amazing that there were so many parts," and "It was fun undoing the screws."

  • photo of Completely absorbed in disassembly

    Completely absorbed in disassembly

  • photo of A disassembled DVD recorder

    A disassembled DVD recorder


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